ALFA ROMEO STELVIO QUADRIFOGLIO

The Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio is no different. In modern-day terms, it has the quirks that come with owning an Italian thoroughbred, but the trade-off is the ability to unleash 505 horses with a sense of flair and style that only comes from a bespoke Italian suit.

“A Beast in an Italian Suit”

BY SANDEEP GILL

The Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio is no different. In modern-day terms, it has the quirks that come with owning an Italian thoroughbred, but the trade-off is the ability to unleash 505 horses with a sense of flair and style that only comes from a bespoke Italian suit.

The joys of owning an Italian Super Car come with certain—intricacies.  You know that on a mainly sunny Sunday morning, when you slide into that perfectly sculpted leather bucket seat and turn the key to fire up that exotic 8 or 12 cylinder engine (whatever your flavor may be), nothing is going to happen because the battery is drained.  Alternatively, when you go to change the oil, it’s not a matter of going down to the local quick lube, but rather a trip to a gentleman likely named Luigi, who will have to take your car in for a month and remove the engine before doing an oil change. This process is a rite of passage into an elite club that all owners accept and understand.  However, on those days that everything jives, the result is nothing short of exquisite, even biblical. The Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio is no different. In modern-day terms, it has the quirks that come with owning an Italian thoroughbred, but the trade-off is the ability to unleash 505 horses with a sense of flair and style that only comes from a bespoke Italian suit.

The Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quadrifoglio, uniquely named after a road stretch in Northern Italy called the Stelvio Pass, runs over the Alps to join Italy’s border with Switzerland’s.

Spanning over 29 miles of epic twists, switchbacks, and turns as it winds its way up the mountainside—arguably the most incredible driving road—the Stelvio Quadrifoglio’s design fits the task of attacking this roadway or, for that matter, any stretch of tarmac.

Before I dive into how the Stelvio achieves this task, you may be asking what “Quadrifoglio” stands for.  The term translates into “green four-leaf clover.”   Alfa Romeo has a history tied into the birth of race car driving.  Their winningest cars are endowed with a painted green four-leaf clover over a white background, a tradition started by Ugo Sivocci.

As fate would have it, it was a day in 1923, while testing his new race car (an Alfa P1), which did not have his good luck charm painted on the vehicle, that he died in a horrible crash.  Since that day, all racing Alfa’s have been adorned with the four-leaf clover or quadrifoglio.

Now that you have had a brief deep dive into racing history let me tell you how the Stelvio lives up to its namesake.  Alfa begins with a rear-wheel-drive chassis borrowed from the Alfa Giulia.  Next, it places at the heart of the machine a Ferrari engineered 90⁰ twin-turbo V6 capable of producing 505 hp and 443 lb-ft of torque.  This power is routed through Alfa’s Q4 system, which is real wheel biased but can send up to 50% of the power to the front wheels when the need arises.

Alfa Romeo has a history tied into the birth of race car driving.  Their winningest cars are endowed with a painted green four-leaf clover over a white background, a tradition started by Ugo Sivocci.

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